Ruby Red – Kerstin Gier Review

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Ruby Red follows a young girl; Gwenyth who comes from a family of time travelers. The time traveling gene is carried down the line as always given to a female born on a specific date. Everyone assumes Gwenyth’s cousin Charlotte will be the one who carries the gene however, Gwenyth’s and her family’s lives get flipped upside down when they realize she is the one who has the gene, not Charlotte. Thrust into a secret group with another time travelling family, Gwenyth begins to learn more about her family and herself.

I think my feelings for this book wildly have to do with the timing I read it. I really was looking for something like this and so that is why I enjoyed it so much, however, there are many problems.
1. The plot is good. Timing is fine and the flow is also good. Information is given nicely because our main character really doesn’t know anything at all so we learn as she learns about time travel etc.

2. Characters are also fine. They seem real enough, especially the secondary characters. It’s strange but I was actually more interested in learning about everyone other than Gideon and Gwenyth; like James and Robert, Rose and Paul and Lady Arista.

3. The writing in this book is what is a huge let down. It’s very bland and juvenile, but this is not the first language-one-translated-into-language-two book I have read so I recognize the faults that come with a translated text. Dialogue is a bit cheesy whereas in its original form it would be natural. Because I knew that this was translated I was able to ignore a lot of the flops in the writing and just enjoy the story as a whole.

This book is primarily focused on plot rather than characters which is okay but I tend to like character driven books more.

The time travel aspect in the book is very interesting though. I like that is very specific:
– In Gwenyth’s family only a female can carry the gene. In Gideon’s family, only a male can carry the gene.
– you have to be born on a specific day (October the 7th I think)
– you can only travel back in time for up to 4 hours at a time
– you travel back to where you are in the present. For example, if I am in my home and I travel back, I will land in the exact same spot in x-period of time. So if you’re in you’re bedroom on the second floor and travel back 100 years, you better hope your house was already built or you might end up falling all the way down to the ground
– you cannot travel to the future or to a period during your lifetime
– the travelling happens unexpectedly if not drawn out once a day. Think of it as built up energy. In a 24 hour period, you build up the time travel ‘energy’ in your body. If you do not use the chronograph (a device that allows you to choose when specifically you travel back in time) to release set ‘energy’, your body will be forced to release it on its own and so you find yourself time travelling randomly to a random time period.
– only Twelve people will ever have this gene. One for each zodiac symbol of you will. Gwenyth is the last; a ruby.

That is was really had me interested. All the background information about time travelling and about how it works and how people used it is very interesting. Also, the secret that the guardians are trying to achieve by gathering all the travellers blood is mysterious. What is their goal ? Is it all. For Count Saint Germain? Is he trying to reach Immortality? Or is it something else completely.

From the moment Lucy and Paul was mentioned I knew they weren’t going to be bad. I knew that the group currently working with Gwenyth are probably the real enemies and the count is the antagonist whereas Lucy and Paul are trying to help them.

I also enjoyed that this book was so light. I flew right through it in almost one sitting (I have a life sometimes 😉)  it didn’t take itself seriously which is good because of its writing.

Overall, I wish I could have read this in its original language. It’s too bad I do not understand German in the least… Unfortunately, with translations, there is always fear of miscommunication. Something that is directly translated may not carry with it its original meaning.

Danke für Lesen!

3.5/5 stars

sincerely,

B ❤

ps. Sorry if I butchered that translation, it’s supposed to say thanks for reading! XD

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